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Voting Rights Case Drags on in Fremont County: At What Cost to Other Counties and Towns?

The pending claims in the Fremont lawsuit are the largest in the Local Government Legal Liability Pool’s 23-year history. The issue of how much the pool—and therefore Wyoming counties and cities—will owe for Fremont County’s costly legal defense in the voting rights case, and for the anticipated costs of the county’s appeal, will be discussed Thursday, Oct. 28, in a key executive-session meeting of the organization’s board of directors in Cheyenne.

Potential Oil Boom in SE Wyo Raises Water Questions

In the arid rolling hills and grasslands of southeast Wyoming there is no surplus of groundwater to allocate, said Bern Hinckley, a hydrogeologist who runs a consulting firm in the city of Laramie. Groundwater in eastern Laramie County, for example, is fully tapped. State regulations require that each gallon diverted to an oil field is a gallon less that can be used to water alfalfa or hay crops used to feed cattle, Hinckley said. "It's a zero-sum game," Hinckley said. "They could hardly have picked a worse place in Wyoming."Industry officials maintain that concerns about water shortages are premature considering no oil wells in the Niobrara field have reported production to the state. John Robitaille, vice president of the Petroleum Association of Wyoming, said there is no reason to believe that water scarcity has slowed the pace of Niobrara development so far, adding, "we don't even know if it's going to become a full-fledged field."

Wind River Tribes Win Big Voting Rights Case

Lander—A federal court decision ordering Fremont County to scrap its system of electing commissioners on a county-wide basis is a major victory for Native Americans who have long complained they are under-represented on the county

Caps & Coal The Wyoming-California Connection

In the summer of 2008, Wyoming’s governor, Dave Freudenthal, went to California for meetings with state officials and utility executives. What he brought was, quite literally, a burning question.California was in the throes of putting together the nation’s first...

Feds Gone Wild Part II: A True Story

When President Bill Clinton signed the Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996 into law in Jackson Hole, his Washington, D.C.-based Minerals Management Service director, Cynthia Quarterman, came out to attend the August ceremony.

Feds Gone Wild Part II: A True Story

When President Bill Clinton signed the Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996 into law in Jackson Hole, his Washington, D.C.-based Minerals Management Service director, Cynthia Quarterman, came out to attend the August ceremony.